The Witch of King’s Cross – Rosaleen Norton

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A story that needs to be told, this ground breaking documentary does the trick. Although at 1 hour 15minutes maybe a little overlong for the format and could be a bit faster. Even so it was great to see and hear her biographer, the late Nevill Drury contributing to the story he did so much to research over several editions of his book Pan’s Daughter : the magical world of Rosaleen Norton. I found the first half the most interesting, when she was younger and a rising star, before the grey men in the Australian patriarchy, and the catholic church brought her down and mostly extinguished her fire, sometimes literally in the fire, when the police were ordered by the courts to burn two of her paintings. Outrageous stuff that courts order burning of pictures, a real witchhunt.

The dirty tricks, the illegal raids on her home by the press are all there. And though she fought back and embraced and reclaimed her witch archetype, it was something of a pyric victory as she ended her days mostly as a recluse and died alone in a hospice run by nuns. Many of her former friends in the film seemed too untogether to be there for her at the end. 

She became something of a parody of herself, sometimes grotesque in the media game. I was so glad to see the pictures of her in her sister’s garden, her hair down and unbleached, no fringe and no crazy eyebrows – just the beautiful person she once was. 

So overall, despite a great body of work, she was well ahead of her time. But a wasted genius, and not through any fault of her own, other than being a woman and a witch.  Her astral magick, with which she connected with Gavin Greenlees and Eugene Goossens enabling them to connect across space and time, is experiencing something of a revival just now and the greater details in Nevill’s book will be useful for that. The patrician musician Goossens was an important occult influence though in the end, the career of this magical superstar was destroyed by a media conceived scandal. He died soon after but never blamed Roie for the any of it; despite her keeping a photographic record of their work, which was stolen from its hiding place in her flat by a hostile journalist and they then sealed her, and his fate. So let us remember her, and induct her into the company of gnostic and tantrik saints. A true original, whose magick and witchcraft did not come from the usual suspects of the time, but was a power of love, direct and from above. 

Honorable mention to the choreographer, actors and sound people for great soundtrack, though was odd that subtitles when pan danced musick subtitled as esoteric when Lilith danced is was dramatic, great track called “Dark Arts” by Brian De Mercia.  Everyone should see this film and support the makers by paying the modest fee to own it. 

Mandrake Newsletter has more information on the biography of Rosaleen Norton Pan’s Daughter and some words from its author Nevill Drury

 

 

 

 

 

Raised by Wolves

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Raised by Wolves a new sci-fi tv series created by Aaron Guzikowski and produced by Ridley Scott.

Starring: Amanda Collin, Abubakar Salim, Winta McGrath, Niamh Algar, Travis Fimmel

Raised by Wolves touches on a lot of issues, concepts and ideas (some might even say taboos) that are so weird we rather not think about but at the same time will raise many questions and a deeper look into the concept of distorted time and how our future actions actually affect our past. 

From the first episode, I was hypnotised by the bleak and oppressive atmosphere that was induced by the very clever use of the colour scheme of grey, dark grey, off-white and cream, even the green and the blue had a greyish effect on the viewer’s psyche. 

The idea that the future of the entire human race, is in the caring (?) hands of two very advanced and sophisticated androids (super androids?) is quite unsettling. It raises questions and awareness, about the ethics of investing in the future development of the human-like androids. At the same time, the realization and understanding that surface from our subconscious are that maybe now is the time, that we need to start getting used to these kinds of ideas and concepts. As it seems that the technology is already here. If that wasn’t enough to fill one with questions and the feeling of dread of “what is going on?” it didn’t take long before a new idea crept up to raise even more questions, adding to the overall feel of uneasiness that flows through the series. 

We learned that our future is in the hands of the super-androids, but now we know they can get hurt, badly and even bleed!  I don’t know about you, but as far as I know, or thought I knew, androids are supposed to be machines and when they get broken we either fix or scrap them. But we all know how Mr Scott works, so why do I find myself surprised and unsettled by a very damaged and bleeding android? Maybe it’s because of the whitish colour of the blood like substance that is pouring out of the body of the android that’s just been shot.

To my mind, if androids had veins, I would be expecting to see a darkish maybe even black oily substance coming out of them. After all, they are machines that run on grease and oil. But here, I think, the white substance is representing two things:

1- The white substance might symbolise that these particular androids are “creatures” of light – you will not find any bit of darkness in them, not even in their veins.

2- The white substance resembles battery acid, hence the androids run on some very advanced batteries. The battery powers the android’s nervous system, sending electric charges all over their very complex body-systems, enabling them to think and to feel?

Those of you that have read thus far probably think to themselves, that there is nothing new in these ideas, we’ve seen all before, and I agree. There is nothing new in the concept of human-android hybrid and definitely is a recurring theme in Ridley Scott films such as in Blade Runner, Alien Covenant. In the classic sci-fi TV program Battlestar Galactica, the human race faces a threat from the Cylons, which are another type of very evolved android in search of god, which brings me to the next unsettling thought that crossed my mind while watching Raised by Wolves. The mother android has been programmed to carry out a mission no matter what. It will use all its power, resources, advanced technologies, calculations and its wits (did I just say wits?) to carry out its mission to success. 

Their android technology is so advanced that at times I find myself thinking that the android really believes in its mission and that belief makes it act and behave in a certain way. It even rejects a different human belief – embracing its maker’s belief as an atheist and rejecting the belief in the all-powerful god – Sol. 

All through the series the theme of believers versus non-believers is slowly advanced as we watch our non-believer heroes beginning to accept the idea that there might be something out there, some kind of power that just might pull the strings on its behalf if they just believe in it. 

On the other side, some of our heroes from the believer’s camp are starting to realize that maybe some aspect of their belief is not acceptable and based on lies. Belief versus non-belief is, of course, the ultimate human dilemma, but now there’s a new player – an atheist programmed android that starts to believe (or is it just malfunctioning?) Throughout the episodes, we watch our heroes, both human and androids trying to understand and work through the complexities of surviving on a cold and dark planet. It gets even more complicated when the android realizes it can dream – and why not, if we go with second theory: (The white substance resembles battery acid, hence the androids run on some very advanced batteries. The battery governs the android’s nervous system, sending electric current all over their very complex body-system, enabling them to think and to feel?) so why not to dream too, deep android electric dreams. The dreams are so deep and mystical, the android becomes some kind of a seer into the future or maybe the past of humankind. 

The last episode blew my mind, the possibilities of a new theory, well new to me anyway, of where we came from and where we are going, made my head spin. And like all of this wasn’t enough, there is a serpent too. A sacred serpent. 

Many of the ideas that unsettled me are not new to sci-fi fans. The difference in Raised by Wolves is that it is done in such a brilliant way that you have to face these ideas while at the same time processing the information. With each episode, the ideas are getting more complex and presented in such a way that they seem completely real and feasible. The horrors of those ideas coming true might make some of us think that Raised by Wolves is another sci-fi horror and gore tv series, but it’s not. There aren’t any Alien type monsters and gore on this planet, and hardly any blood crazy scenes (if at all). What makes us feel this way is how we are presented with those far-out ideas and concepts.

I wish I could say some more, but then it would contain spoilers. Raised by Wolves definitely won’t be everybody’s cup of tea, and I think it might raise some questions and a few eyebrows even with hardcore sci-fi fans. I think it was great, definitely made me think and hope for a better future so we can have an even better past.

You can watch the trailer HERE